The Just-World Belief System

justice , psychology , social psychology , victim blaming , victims

Beyond Bounds

Do you believe that everything happens for a reason? Do you believe you reap what you sow? Or maybe, what goes around comes around? Such figures of speech, that suggest inevitable retaliation, are part of a just-world belief system.

Those who have been raised in a religious context, or are aware of it, understand that good people go to heaven and sinners go to hell. They are taught that we have consequences for our actions and thoughts. Similarly, we have been systematically conditioned in schools that we get punished when we misbehave and we get rewarded if we’re compliant. You grow up with the assumption or association that when you do good things, you get rewarded and when you do bad things, you get punished.

This might explain why some people accuse poor people of being lazy. They believe that disadvantaged groups are the way they are as a consequence…

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Today I Lost A Friend (And I Caused It)

abuse, chronic illness, communication, control, emotional abuse, friendship, passive aggression, passive aggressive abuse, relationship, walk to wellness

Walk to Wellness

jonatan-becerra-Frdj333dsuY-unsplash

Today I lost a friend, and I caused that loss.  I’m sad.  Actually, more devastated.  She has been my very close friend throughout this year at university, but prior to that we were friends for about 3 years.

We were going to do a thing together, one that had major financial implications for me, and a lot of time investment from her.  I decided it was not going to work for me, it was not something I wanted to do at all, I told her before she devoted herself to it.  We’d both put some time into it, her more than I, and she’d put some money into it, but neither of us would lose a huge amount.

I decided it wasn’t going to work for me for a number of reasons, some of which were friendship problems (I didn’t think our friendship would survive the business relationship), and the…

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The Paradox of Toxic Relationships: The signs of manipulation by toxic people

mental health , relationship , toxic people

Mellifluous Dreams

Do you feel choked in the presence of your partner, friend or relative?

Do
you feel that your energy is drained and you just want to sleep?

Do
you suffer financial crisis after coming into contact with a certain person?

Chances are high
you’ve encountered a toxic person in your life. You may have even realized this
“friend” or family member was no good (kudos to you!), but it can often be hard
to distinguish between feelings of love and friendship and feelings of guilt and
manipulation. Toxic people arereallygood at purposefully confusing us.

These three personalities,

Nancy Irwin- Psy.D.,
ofSeasonsin Malibu, as well asauthor, therapist

Varun Singh –CS Mentor,
Applied Behaviour science scholar

Shannon Thomas – general
badass survivorShannon Thomas, LCSW

Will show us to spot the
toxic people in our lives.

We have brought
you one of the most heinous…

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Polyamory: In an age of more, is one lover enough?

Lifestyle, Mental Health, Monogamy, Polyamory, Psychology, Sex, Sexual Health, Threesome

On The Record

Polyamory is becoming increasingly popular as society changes (Image Source: Getty Images)

By Zoe Kassiotis | @ZKassiotis

As today’s social media generation continue to challenge norms with their sex-positive attitudes, one tide certainly seems to be changing: relationships.

The monogamous archetype is an unrealistic illusion for many Australians who currently practice consensual non-monogamy (CNM) within their relationships.

CNM is an umbrella term that covers several relationship models, such as open relationships, recreational sex with more than two people, and swinging (swapping sexual partners within a group), but one that has had a lot of airtime recent is polyamory.

The definition of polyamory (poly coming from the Greek “more than one” and amor from the Latin “love”) is a non-monogamous sexual and long-term emotional relationship where all partners consent to and have knowledge of each another.

Though norm-challenging and label-shunning millennials are increasingly accepting of CNM, a lack of Australian…

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